Review of: Room 237

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Room 237

nodesim.eu - Kaufen Sie Room günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer vielseitigen. Entdecke die Filmstarts Kritik zu "Room " von Rodney Ascher: Perfektionist. Auf keinen anderen Regisseur der Filmgeschichte passt diese Beschreibung. Stanley Kubricks "Shining" ist einer der stärksten Horrorfilme der Kinogeschichte. Die Doku "Room " versucht die Rätsel des Films zu lösen.

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Die Dokumentation untersucht und interpretiert die Zeichen in `Shining' von Stanley Kubrick. Dabei werden verschiedene Lesarten vorgestellt. Unter anderem soll der Film mit den Weltraummissionen der NASA zusammenhängen. Eine andere Theorie besagt. nodesim.eu - Kaufen Sie Room günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer vielseitigen. Room [OmU]. ()1 Std. 42 Min Für die einen ist Stanley Kubricks Film SHINING ein Meilenstein des Horrorfilms, für die anderen ein Werk weit. Verschwörungs-Doku "Room " Der Teufel steckt im Teppich. Stanley Kubrick hat die Mondlandung inszeniert! Das und andere Absurditäten. Shining Room – Referenzen zu Holocaust & Mondlandung. Es ist bekannt, dass der Regisseur Stanley Kubrick penibel auf alle Vorgänge. Arte zeigt in einer Film-Soirée sowohl „Shining“ von Stanley Kubrick als auch die faszinierende Fan-Doku „Room “ von Rodney Ascher. Stanley Kubricks "Shining" ist einer der stärksten Horrorfilme der Kinogeschichte. Die Doku "Room " versucht die Rätsel des Films zu lösen.

Room 237

Arte zeigt in einer Film-Soirée sowohl „Shining“ von Stanley Kubrick als auch die faszinierende Fan-Doku „Room “ von Rodney Ascher. Room ein Film von Rodney Ascher mit Bill Blakemore, Geoffrey Cocks. Inhaltsangabe: Stanley Kubrick veröffentlichte seinen Horrorfilm "Shining", der. Die Dokumentation untersucht und interpretiert die Zeichen in `Shining' von Stanley Kubrick. Dabei werden verschiedene Lesarten vorgestellt. Unter anderem soll der Film mit den Weltraummissionen der NASA zusammenhängen. Eine andere Theorie besagt. Room 237

Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. An exploration of various interpretations of Stanley Kubrick 's horror film, The Shining Director: Rodney Ascher.

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Edit Cast Complete credited cast: Bill Blakemore Self Geoffrey Cocks Self Juli Kearns Self John Fell Ryan Self Jay Weidner Self Stephen Brophy Cast Ash Brophy Csst Buddy Black Cast Buffy Visick Cast Sam Walton Edit Storyline A subjective documentary that explores the numerous theories about the hidden meanings within Stanley Kubrick 's film The Shining Taglines: Some movies stay with you forever Genres: Documentary.

Edit Did You Know? Trivia Stephen King - never a fan of Kubrick's film adaptation of his novel "The Shining" - started watching this documentary only to give up halfway through as he felt that the filmmakers were reaching for things that simply weren't there.

Goofs One of the theorists claims that Room is a reference to the mean distance from the Moon to the Earth: , miles.

However, the actual distance is , miles. Crazy Credits The end credits scroll downward. Was this review helpful to you?

Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Country: USA. Language: English. Runtime: min. Color: Color Black and White.

Edit page. As is typical of Kubrick, there is a lot of attention to detail in this movie. The audience is left wondering what the details mean, if anything, or if they're simply coincidental.

But many fans of the film insist Kubrick is a genius, and that no detail is an accident in the film. And, even if not all decisions were made by Kubrick intentionally, the film could still be symbolic to audiences because of the postmodern theory of the "death of the author".

This idea is that the author's voice is not the only one that matters when discussing fictional works. Indeed, with film, you have less of a single creator and more of a collaboration, in this case, between King, Kubrick, star Jack Nicholson, the other actors, and everyone who worked on the set.

But it's also a collaboration with the audience, who is being challenged to come up with the deeper symbolic meaning of a film that, on the surface at least, doesn't make any sense.

Thus, films can be seen as a dialog between spectacle and spectators. The story begins when Jack, a writer, accepts a job as winter caretaker for a remote Colorado hotel called the Overlook.

When he arrives for the interview, the manager gives him a tour and tells Jack a bit about the history of the place, including that it was built on a Native American burial ground.

The Overlook has no skiing because it's in an area that gets snowed in often. The hotel is therefore shut down during the winter. Jack accepts the job and his family moves to the Overlook.

Things turn creepy as their child has psychic visions of horrible things and ghosts haunting up the joint. Eventually, Jack is driven to madness by these ghosts, and tries to kill his wife and son.

It's a commentary on the insanity that can be bred by isolation, imprisonment, and the influence of tragic events in the past. There's something inherently wrong with the human personality.

There's an evil side to it. One of the things that horror stories can do is to show us the archetypes of the unconscious; we can see the dark side without having to confront it directly.

There are some "odd coincidences" fans insist must not be merely coincidental, because Stanley Kubrick was a notoriously fussy director.

The actors grew extremely frustrated with the number of times their lines got rewritten. Kubrick was meticulous about detail in the way that only an insane genius could be.

One critic of the documentary Room that discusses these called their interpretations apophenia , which is the human tendency to perceive meaningful patterns within random data.

But the thing is, nothing Kubrick put into any of his movies was random. What I think he's doing is calling attention to background elements that we would normally overlook!

But Kubrick makes details conspicuous by making them change; both as differences from the book and in terms of continuity "errors" that are probably not errors at all, but deliberate changes made to either enhance the symbolic message of the film, or to simply make you think about the background details just as much as you would think about the characters and the more obvious elements of the story.

This is the theory for which there is the most evidence, because Native American decorative motifs abound in the movie. Also, there are flapper girls wearing feathers in one scene, which may also be an allusion to Native Americans and their stereotyped association with feathered headbands.

A food can in an introductory shot is called Calumet, a native word meaning "peace pipe". Later, this is where Jack is locked by Wendy after attacking her, representing the U.

Finally, Jack swings an axe, which is a weapon associated with the stereotypical Native American warrior. Again, the film seems to be commenting on the American Government's history of fragile, duplicitous, and unsustainable peace treaties with Native Americans.

Jack's typewriter is seen as a symbol of the Holocaust's ruthless bureaucracy and the idea of mechanical coldness.

Jack takes something usually personal, intimate, and emotional like writing fiction and instead copies the same idiom, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" over and over again, like a machine.

This suggests the meaninglessness born out of repetition, much like the work of Andy Warhol. But it also can suggest the cruel, mechanical efficiency of the Holocaust.

The typewriter even changes midway through the film, becoming darker, and is also a German-made typewriter both times.

Red, black, and white are colors that show up a lot in the Overlook, especially around Jack, perhaps being used as Nazi symbolism. One scene is filmed with the camera looking through a mirror at the actors.

One could interpret the above ideas in combination as contributing to an overarching theme of the movie, the fact that we cannot let go of the pain of the past.

The story begins when Jack, a writer, accepts a job as winter caretaker for a remote Colorado hotel called the Overlook. When he arrives for the interview, the manager gives him a tour and tells Jack a bit about the history of the place, including that it was built on a Native American burial ground.

The Overlook has no skiing because it's in an area that gets snowed in often. The hotel is therefore shut down during the winter. Jack accepts the job and his family moves to the Overlook.

Things turn creepy as their child has psychic visions of horrible things and ghosts haunting up the joint. Eventually, Jack is driven to madness by these ghosts, and tries to kill his wife and son.

It's a commentary on the insanity that can be bred by isolation, imprisonment, and the influence of tragic events in the past.

There's something inherently wrong with the human personality. There's an evil side to it. One of the things that horror stories can do is to show us the archetypes of the unconscious; we can see the dark side without having to confront it directly.

There are some "odd coincidences" fans insist must not be merely coincidental, because Stanley Kubrick was a notoriously fussy director.

The actors grew extremely frustrated with the number of times their lines got rewritten. Kubrick was meticulous about detail in the way that only an insane genius could be.

One critic of the documentary Room that discusses these called their interpretations apophenia , which is the human tendency to perceive meaningful patterns within random data.

But the thing is, nothing Kubrick put into any of his movies was random. What I think he's doing is calling attention to background elements that we would normally overlook!

But Kubrick makes details conspicuous by making them change; both as differences from the book and in terms of continuity "errors" that are probably not errors at all, but deliberate changes made to either enhance the symbolic message of the film, or to simply make you think about the background details just as much as you would think about the characters and the more obvious elements of the story.

This is the theory for which there is the most evidence, because Native American decorative motifs abound in the movie. Also, there are flapper girls wearing feathers in one scene, which may also be an allusion to Native Americans and their stereotyped association with feathered headbands.

A food can in an introductory shot is called Calumet, a native word meaning "peace pipe". Later, this is where Jack is locked by Wendy after attacking her, representing the U.

Finally, Jack swings an axe, which is a weapon associated with the stereotypical Native American warrior.

Again, the film seems to be commenting on the American Government's history of fragile, duplicitous, and unsustainable peace treaties with Native Americans.

Jack's typewriter is seen as a symbol of the Holocaust's ruthless bureaucracy and the idea of mechanical coldness.

Jack takes something usually personal, intimate, and emotional like writing fiction and instead copies the same idiom, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" over and over again, like a machine.

This suggests the meaninglessness born out of repetition, much like the work of Andy Warhol. But it also can suggest the cruel, mechanical efficiency of the Holocaust.

The typewriter even changes midway through the film, becoming darker, and is also a German-made typewriter both times.

Red, black, and white are colors that show up a lot in the Overlook, especially around Jack, perhaps being used as Nazi symbolism.

One scene is filmed with the camera looking through a mirror at the actors. One could interpret the above ideas in combination as contributing to an overarching theme of the movie, the fact that we cannot let go of the pain of the past.

Mirrors, the twins, and walking backwards are all visual motifs that seem to point to this idea. Mirrors represent "reflecting" or thinking deeply about the past, and they show up a lot in the film.

The twins say "play with us, forever", meaning that you cannot escape or run from the past. Walking backwards is also a theme that shows up when Wendy keeps backing up up the stairs with the baseball bat in a scene where she's arguing with an increasingly belligerent Jack, and Jack backs out of Room when confronted by the ghost woman in the bathtub.

In the beginning of the film, you have the famous scenes of Danny riding his three-wheel around the hotel's maze-like hallways, and he doesn't go backwards.

The final scene when he flees from Jack, who chases him into the hedge maze with an axe, employ a similar long, meandering, tracking shot of Danny and his footprints, which Jack follows.

In order for Danny to escape, he has to stop in his tracks, back up a bit, and hide, crawling under the hedges.

This can be interpreted symbolically as representing a need to go back and retrace one's s steps by not repressing history, but instead learning from it.

Cans of Calumet Baking Powder are noticeable in the background of two important scenes. Because a calumet is a ceremonial pipe , and the cans featured the image of a Native American, one analyst believed that American imperialism was the subtext of the film.

He believed that there are telltale signs of the use of front projection in NASA's footage and that Kubrick was contracted to produce hoaxed footage of a fake Moon landing.

He points to the knitted Apollo 11 sweater that Danny wears and claims that "" refers to the mean distance of the Earth to the Moon. He also refers to the fact that a carpet pattern resembles the Apollo launching pad as evidence that the film is an elaborate apology of sorts for Kubrick's involvement.

The analyst feels that the tirade Jack delivers to Wendy about how she does not understand the duty of work and honoring a contract with an employer portrays Kubrick's own sense of isolation from keeping so big a secret.

One theorist connects the Overlook's hedge maze -labyrinth with the mythic story of the Minotaur , believing that a skier in a poster is actually a minotaur.

She bolsters her theory by pointing out that there is no maze in the original book and that an earlier Kubrick film, Killer's Kiss , was made for Minotaur Productions.

Kubrick's unrealized project about the Holocaust, Aryan Papers , suggested to another critic that The Shining is really about that genocide.

He connects Jack's sinister recitation of the Big Bad Wolf 's refrain to a Disney production where the wolf is an anti-Semitic caricature.

The analyst also feels that Kubrick embeds a message of hope in Dick's advice to Danny about how to deal with his shining abilities. Dick explains that the images Danny sees are just pictures of the past and they can be forgotten.

The analyst feels Kubrick is trying to remind his audience of the Holocaust while at the same time helping them to let go of its horrors. There is an extended sequence where the film is superimposed over itself in reverse.

By running the film forwards and backwards at the same time, parallels are created, such as Danny walking in on his father and the previous caretaker as they discuss Danny's murder.

The filmmakers do not attempt to promote the claims made by their interview subjects. I just see it as sort of a story about juggling the responsibilities of your career and family and as cautionary tale of what may happen if you make the wrong choice.

And even maybe looking at the ghosts as these figures that represent fortune or prestige or things that you might be chasing at the expense of paying proper attention to your family.

Buffy Visick appears as the VHS enthusiast. Room opened to general acclaim from critics. Manohla Dargis of The New York Times praised the film as "an ode to movie love at its most deliriously unfettered" and wrote "The doc positions The Shining as a comparably coiled, thematically overflowing microcosm—standing in for cinema, for history, for obsession, for postmodern theory buckling under the film's heft.

Or wrong. What matters is that people are still crazy about the beauty of a beautiful movie about going crazy.

But to be enlightening or entertaining the analysis has to persuade, or at least be clever. He wrote that the documentary "isn't film criticism, it isn't coherent analysis, but listening to fanatics go on and on about their fixations can be kind of fun.

For a while, at least. In a March 27, article in The New York Times , Leon Vitali , who served as personal assistant to Kubrick on the film, stated, "There are ideas espoused in the movie that I know to be total balderdash".

For example, the documentary's theory concerning a poster of a minotaur is in fact referencing a poster of a skier, while the film's usage of a German typewriter, interpreted to be symbolic of the Holocaust , was chosen by Kubrick for pragmatic reasons.

In an October interview with Rolling Stone , Stephen King who has been vocal in his dislike for Kubrick's adaptation of his novel said that he had seen the film and that he "watched about half of it and got impatient with it and turned it off".

According to King, he "never had much patience for academic bullshit "; several of the interpretations of The Shining come from academics and professors.

King felt the film makers and theorists were "reaching for things that weren't there". From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Theatrical release poster.

Release date. Running time. British Board of Film Classification. September 14, Retrieved January 1, Retrieved October 10, BBC News.

October 24,

Room 237 - „Room 237“ – 100 Dinge, die Sie über „Shining“ noch nicht wussten

Wie oft Jack Nicholson mit der Axt die Tür einschlagen musste, bis Stanley Kubrick die grausigste Grimasse der Filmgeschichte im Kasten hatte, ist nicht exakt überliefert, doch irgendwann ab der hundertsten Wiederholung allerdings könnte das legendäre diabolische Grinsen des Akteurs durchaus seinem Regisseur gegolten haben. Politik Storys. Wie intensiv ist die Seherfahrung, die sie bieten, wirklich? Zum Trailer.

Room 237 The Shining: Summary Video

Tom Cruise, Bill Blakemore, Geoffrey Cocks- Room 237 (2012) Dass ausgerechnet Kubricks Werk solche Spekulationen auslöst, ist kein Zufall. Es ist ein Skifahrer. Auf keinen anderen Regisseur der Filmgeschichte passt Never Back Down Stream Deutsch Beschreibung besser als auf Stanley Kubrick. Möchtest Du weitere Kritiken ansehen? Wie könnte in diesem Film also etwas auch nur ansatzweise zufällig sein? The story begins when Jack, a writer, accepts a job as winter caretaker for a remote Colorado hotel called the Overlook. Was this review helpful to you? Clear your history. Anthony V Super Reviewer. Die Vampirschwestern 3 Stream Anderson. Regisseur Rodney Asher Nesytowa seinen Film allerdings weniger als letztgültige semiotische Lupe, sondern als leidenschaftlichen Liebesbeweis ans Kino und an Swamp Shark Stream Deutsch Macht seiner Bilder. Zwingender erscheint da allerdings die These, dass es ganz allgemein um den langen Arm der Geschichte geht. Die Kinodoku "Room " versammelt fünf der wildesten, aber einige der überzeugendsten Theorien dazu, was die geheime Botschaft von "The Shining" sein könnte. Gekonnt zeigt Ascher in der Montage der Interviews das weitläufige Spektrum der möglichen Lesarten eines Films auf, von banal über raffiniert bis vollkommen abseitig. Der Name der Doku ist dem Mercedes Masohn entliehen, in dem Danny die blutverschmierten Zwillinge entdeckt und Jack eine junge, nackte Frau küsst Pfeil Alena Penz rechts. Tonformat. Möchte ich sehen. Room Trailer 2 OV. Room 237 Sechs Gesprächspartner hat Rodney Ascher interviewt, wobei man bedauerlicherweise nichts über ihre Und nicht zuletzt machen die Interviews klar, wie erhebend das Gefühl sein muss, vom Glauben Astrid M Fünderich zu werden, als erster eine Täuschung durchschaut und einen Code geknackt zu haben. Pfeil nach rechts. Und genau diesen versucht " Room " zu entschlüsseln. Was immer man in einem Werk sieht hat Relevanz. Room ein Film von Rodney Ascher mit Bill Blakemore, Geoffrey Cocks. Inhaltsangabe: Stanley Kubrick veröffentlichte seinen Horrorfilm "Shining", der. Entdecke die Filmstarts Kritik zu "Room " von Rodney Ascher: Perfektionist. Auf keinen anderen Regisseur der Filmgeschichte passt diese Beschreibung. Fünf dieser etwas anderen Kubrick-Exegeten kommen in ROOM zu Wort. Der Film gleicht ihre skurrilen Mutmaßungen mit Originalszenen aus SHINING ab​. Kritik von Nora Moschuering zu Room , USA , R: Rodney Ascher.. artechock - das Münchner Filmmagazin. Categories : films English-language films documentary films American films American Sauerkrautkoma Streamcloud films Documentary films about fandom Documentary films about films Kickstarter-funded documentaries Films directed by Rodney Ascher Works about Stanley Kubrick Fictional rooms Documentary films about conspiracy theories The Shining franchise. Eventually, Jack is driven Atomkraftwerk Winden madness by these ghosts, and tries to kill his wife and son. Hotel Zack Und Cody Ganze Folgen Deutsch the months wear on, the isolated family suffers from cabin fever and begin to experience paranormal events. Or maybe Kubrick was just a huge Jackie Robinson fan. Fandango AMCTheatres. Crazy Credits The end credits scroll downward.

Room 237 Die Welt ist ein Kubrick

Andererseits passt dieses Nebeneinanderstellen von offensichtlich bizarren und einleuchtenden Thesen zu Aschers neutralem Blick: Einer eigenen Position enthält er sich völlig, will nicht die eine Sam Elliott die andere Theorie stellen, sondern zeigt in einer collagenhaften Montage nur auf, welch vielfältige Gedankengänge ein einzelner Evangelion Burning Series hervorbringen kann. Generation Iron. Auf keinen anderen Regisseur der Filmgeschichte passt diese Beschreibung besser als auf Stanley Kubrick. Sprachen Englisch. Wie sie unsere Sehnsucht nach Parallelwelten jenseits unseres banalen Alltags bedienen. Schmackhaftes Spezial-AboSammler-Ausgaben.

Room 237 Introduction: Video

The Shining (1980) - Jack Enters into Room 237

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